What is a Hash and How Does it Work in the Blockchain Network?

Photo by Morthy Jameson on Unsplash

Blockchain is one of the most powerful technologies today. It’s a digitized, decentralized public ledger that records transactions happening across a peer-to-peer network. The power of this technology is in its ability to create trust between two unknown parties without the need for an intermediary like a bank or government.

What is a Hash?

But there are many ways it can be misunderstood and misused, which has led to some skepticism about blockchain technology. To better understand how it works, let’s look at what makes up these blocks on the chain: hashes. Hashes are strings of characters representing numbers in fixed formats; they make data easy to identify and analyze by computers because they’re always uniform length no matter their content (like “7c6e7ba8467739f5”). Some of these hashes, known as “bitcoin addresses,” are used to send and receive cryptocurrency.

Hashing

When a transaction broadcasts to the blockchain network, it first goes through hashing before being confirmed as valid. As transactions flow through the network from one person to another, they’re assigned a digital fingerprint known as a hash. This process makes it impossible to modify the data once the transaction is processed and sent out onto the blockchain.

In other words, hashes ensure that information on the blockchain is incorruptible. Because of this, modifying transactions from previous blocks would lead to the assignment of incorrect data to the blockchain. For example, if someone tried to edit the number of coins attached to a transaction before it was confirmed, that person would have to recheck all subsequent transactions because their risk for tampering would be readily noticeable.

Hashes and Security

Hashes are one way blockchains increase security and ensure trust in a decentralized system. There’s no central authority in the blockchain network, so no trusted third party can change or adjust transaction data. Instead, transactions are verified by everyone on the web using hashing.

These hashes are just one way blockchains increase security and ensure trust in a decentralized system.

Hashes also store essential pieces of data about each transaction. These pieces of data are stored in the blockchain when it’s cryptographically created.

According to Forbes, they make up all types of data, whether they’re addresses for cryptocurrency transactions or critical information about each transaction. Since money is often stored on cryptocurrencies, this data is vital to keep accurate.

Trust in the System

Blockchain technology can be understood as a network of blocks composed of transactions, with each block holding transaction pieces like hashes and timestamps. This hashing process makes it so blockchain transactions can’t be altered once they’ve been sent out onto the network, which helps ensure trust in the system.

Speaking of trust, it’s also important to note that because data is stored in a decentralized system, no one on the blockchain can gain complete control of all information. This decentralization makes it so specific network segments can’t be hacked or manipulated without being noticed by other people on the blockchain.

For example, if someone did try to alter a block of transactions, they’d have to tamper with every single block coming after it for the change to go unnoticed. This type of tampering would be almost impossible to do without someone alerting the community that an error had occurred.

To sum it up, blockchain is a public ledger that records transactions happening across a peer-to-peer network. Hashes are crucial pieces of data attached to these transactions, making them so they are tamper-proof. This ensures trust in the network and helps prevent hacking attempts.

A blockchain network is a group of blocks that hold different kinds of data involved in cryptocurrency transactions. Among this data are hashes, which help secure the system and make it impossible to change transactions.

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I am an eclectic writer with many interests and topics that go through my head daily. I am extremely passionate about my craft and always want to push further.

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Gary Mike Adams

Gary Mike Adams

I am an eclectic writer with many interests and topics that go through my head daily. I am extremely passionate about my craft and always want to push further.

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